Evadot Podcast #36 – Moonbots Team Just Ducky

Some kids spend their weekends watching TV and playing video games.  Moonbots team “Just Ducky” plans missions and programs Moon rovers.

In preparation for the Podcast, they took the advice they found in “Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy“:  A towel is one of the most useful things in the Universe.  They did the show with towels around their necks 🙂

They drew much of their inspiration from the Google Lunar X PRIZE Team Part Time Scientists.  Check out this email to them last week:

Hello,
We wanted to say, “Thank You!”.  Part Time Scientists really inspired our team during the Moonbot Challenge.  Even though we did not win the competition we had a lot of fun and we now follow your team.  We admired how your team takes risks by putting out your ideas for the world to view.  We decided early into the competition we would like copy this philosophy.  Please take a moment to look at our short documentary to notice how we incorporated information from your articles about your rover wheels.  Good Luck and we will be watching!http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHZx_zzgMls
Team Just Ducky

These kids are the next generation of scientists and space explorers. We can’t wait to see what they do next.

Email podcast@evadot.com or leave a comment and let us know your thoughts.

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5 thoughts on “Evadot Podcast #36 – Moonbots Team Just Ducky

  1. I would like to give a short summary on the questions posed in this podcast: What got them involved? Building a rover, putting it onto a rocket and shooting it to the moon? How could there be possibly anything more awesome to do?! Hell yeah, it’s rocket science!

    Where do they actually learn how to do this? We are bringing together many people with different skill-sets. If we don’t have already the right knowledge in the team, we search for industrial partners that do. We are also well connected with people in space agencies that we consult. Additionally there are lots of information available on the internet nowadays.

    What kind of sensors do they use to tell where things are, where it is? The main sensor of our rover is the stereoscopic camera. It provides information about the environment and allows us to navigate around. Additionally there are accelerometer, gyroscopes, temperature sensors etc..

    How it is able to survive in the extreme temperatures over there? This is a really tough problem to solve and it involves smart design of the rover surfaces and a very good heat guiding on the inside. Possibly using active components as well.

    What kind of programming languages do they use? C/C++ for the processors, VHDL for the FPGA and some other languages that allow for faster turn around times.

    These are just quick shots and I bet you will be able to read more once Michael has visited the team summit!

  2. Thank you Part Time Scientists for your prompt response to our team questions. Learning from your team has been an awesome experience and we certainly wouldn’t find these great answers in our text books!
    ~Team Just Ducky

  3. Thank you Part Time Scientists for your prompt response to our team questions. Learning from your team has been an awesome experience and we certainly wouldn’t find these great answers in our text books!~Just Ducky

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